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Dr Richard Johnson On Aspen Public Radio

September 19, 2016  |  Post by:  |  Uncategorized Comments Off on Dr Richard Johnson On Aspen Public Radio

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A Killing Heat Warming temperatures may be causing a global wave of kidney disease.

September 19, 2016  |  Post by:  |  Uncategorized Comments Off on A Killing Heat Warming temperatures may be causing a global wave of kidney disease.

Published On Sep 08, 2016

Clinical Research

A Killing Heat

Warming temperatures may be causing a global wave of kidney disease.

In the Chichigalpa region of northwest Nicaragua, male sugarcane workers have been dying at such alarming rates that locals have named the region the “land of widows.” The culprit is chronic kidney disease (CKD). But while CKD is most commonly caused by hypertension and diabetes—both of which can damage the delicate filters the kidneys rely on to remove waste from the body—most of the victims there don’t suffer from either condition.

This epidemic isn’t confined within Nicaraguan borders. In the past two decades, CKD has killed an estimated 20,000 people throughout Central America, and has also claimed victims in Southeast Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Some researchers believe that the common denominator is intense heat and dehydration, according to an assessment report in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology in May 2016. The reason for the sudden uptick in deaths, the authors say, may be a warming planet.

“We are seeing a new type of CKD and climate change appears to be exacerbating the issue,” says Richard J. Johnson, a nephrologist at the University of Colorado Hospital Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colo., and a co-author of the report. “CKD may well be one of the first epidemics because of global warming.”

Read The Full Article Here.

Climate change & kidney disease on CCTV America

June 02, 2016  |  Post by:  |  Uncategorized Comments Off on Climate change & kidney disease on CCTV America

Dr. Richard Johnson Discusses the Dangers of Sugar

August 08, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Uncategorized No Comments

National Geographic recently interviewed Dr. Richard Johnson, co-author of Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology, 4th Edition, in its new article “Sugar Love: (A Not So Sweet Story).” The feature explores the history of sugar dating back to its early cultural uses approximately 10,000 years ago, through its eventual foray into mass production and into present-day consumption.

Putting into perspective how common sugar has become in the American diet, the article cites that the average American consumes 77 pounds of added sugar annually, equating to more than 22 teaspoons of added sugar per day. Dr. Johnson states that this mammoth increase in daily sugar intake is at the root of various medical conditions.

“It seems like every time I study an illness and trace a path to the first cause, I find my way back to sugar.

Why is it that one-third of adults [worldwide] have high blood pressure, when in 1900 only 5 percent had high blood pressure? Why did 153 million people have diabetes in 1980, and now we’re up to 347 million? Why are more and more Americans obese? Sugar, we believe, is one of the culprits, if not the major culprit.”

Full story here:

Which sweeteners are most likely to raise blood pressure in children?

July 13, 2012  |  Post by:  |  Uncategorized No Comments

From Examiner.com |  07/13/12

…An excess of most any sweet food is one way to create an imbalance or inflammation in a child’s body. With the rising rate of high blood pressure in children, is there any food which these kids eat in common and in excess? It’s likely to be fructose in excess amounts that may contribute…Dietary Fructose on Food Intake.” In another study from the University of Colorado researchers found that even people who eat a healthy , low-sodium…

Full article here.

Your Brain on Sugar. Sugar worse than cocaine?

June 19, 2012  |  Post by:  |  Uncategorized No Comments

Via Webmd.com [sic]

A SLUGGISH WORKOUT Muscles need sugar for fuel, so carbs (which break up into glucose, a type of sim-ple sugar) can kick-start your morning jog. But fruit or prepackaged snacks touting “natural sweeteners” contain just fructose, which is metabolized in the liver, not the muscles. The result: bloat, or even the runs.

THE FIX A glucose-packed snack with just 4 to 8 grams of fructose—it’ll help increase glucose absorption, says Dr. Richard Johnson, professor of medicine at the University of Colorado, Denver. Try a sports drink like Gatorade or trail mix with dried fruit an hour before your workout.

Full article here.

Every Man a King: Henry VIII’s Worst Affliction Is on the Rise in America

June 05, 2012  |  Post by:  |  Uncategorized No Comments

Dr. Richard J. Johnson, a professor of medicine and head of the division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension at the University of Colorado-Denver, said there is “overwhelming” evidence that the fructose in high-fructose corn syrup–he calls it “metabolic poison”–increases the risk for gout. The use of HFCS in virtually all processed foods makes it hard to avoid, but has a great deal to do with the apparent uptick in gout cases in recent years.

From the www.theatlantic.com

Study questions fructose role in hypertension

June 01, 2012  |  Post by:  |  Uncategorized No Comments

Dr. Richard Johnson, a professor at the University of Colorado, Denver, who was not involved in the study, said the results are not enough to let fructose off the hook. Work by Johnson and others has implicated fructose as a factor related to the risk of high blood pressure (see Reuters Health story of July 1, 2010).

Full story here.

How Sugar Affects the Body in Motion

May 29, 2011  |  Post by:  |  Uncategorized No Comments

New York times, May 11, 2011

But that half-hour stroll could affect how your body responds to sugar, other new science suggests. You may not need Skittles to fuel the walk, but the walk will affect how your body metabolizes the candy, if you do indulge. Activity can “significantly reduce the health risks associated with fructose and other forms of sugar,” said Dr. Richard J. Johnson, a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Denver, who has long studied fructose metabolism and was an author of a review article last year about fructose and exercise.

Full New York Times article here.