Dr. Richard Johnson on BBC “Fructose The Bittersweet Sugar”.

January 09, 2014  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News Comments Off on Dr. Richard Johnson on BBC “Fructose The Bittersweet Sugar”.

If you believe the headlines fructose is “addictive as cocaine” , a “toxic additive” or a “metabolic danger”. So how has a simple sugar in fruit got such a bad name and is there any evidence behind the accusations that it has caused the obesity epidemic? Meanwhile, a new health claim approved by the European Union promoting the benefits of fructose containing foods or drinks, comes into force in the New Year. So where does the truth lie? Dr Mark Porter talks to leading world experts to sift through the evidence.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03nt9wj

 

 

 

 

 

Researchers link obesity and the body’s production of fructose

December 31, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News No Comments

 

 

Researchers link obesity and the body’s production of fructose

AURORA, Colo. (Sept. 10, 2013) – Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine reported today that the cause of obesity and insulin resistance may be tied to the fructose your body makes in addition to the fructose you eat.  In recent years the role of added sweeteners, such as high fructose corn syrup and table sugar (sucrose), has taken center stage as risk factors for obesity and insulin resistance. Numerous studies suggest that the risk from added sugars may be due to the fructose content.  But in the study published in the Sept. 10 edition of Nature Communications, the team led by researchers at the CU School of Medicine reports that fatty liver and insulin resistance may also result from fructose produced in the liver from non-fructose containing carbohydrates.  The study, whose first authors are Miguel Lanaspa, PhD, and Takuji Ishimoto, MD, reported that mice can convert glucose to fructose in the liver, and that this conversion was critical for driving the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mice fed glucose.  “Our data suggests that it is the fructose generated from glucose that is largely responsible for how carbohydrates cause fatty liver and insulin resistance,” said Lanaspa.  Richard Johnson, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the division of renal diseases and hypertension at the School of Medicine and senior author of the paper, said: “Our studies provide an understanding for why high glycemic foods may increase the risk for obesity and insulin resistance. While some of the weight gain is driven by the caloric content and the effects of stimulating insulin, the ability of high glycemic foods to cause insulin resistance and fatty liver is due in part to the conversion of glucose to fructose inside the body.  “Ironically, our study shows that much of the risk from ingesting high glycemic foods is actually due to the generation of fructose, which is a low glycemic sugar. These studies challenge the dogma that fructose is safe and that it is simply the high glycemic carbohydrates that need to be restricted.”

Source — http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-09/uocd-rlo091013.ph

Dr. Johnson inteviewed by MedPageToday

December 29, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News No Comments

Fructose, Uric Acid Culprits in Diabetes, Obesity

MedPageToday, 12.21

To catch up on the latest findings in ongoing research, we talked with Richard J. Johnson, MD, chief of the Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Johnson published two books on these topics, “The Sugar Fix” and “The Fat Switch.”

Dr. Richard Johnson in the Irish Times

October 30, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News No Comments

It’s not that you get fat by eating too much or exercising too little, says Dr Richard Johnson, a leading kidney specialist at the University of Colorado. “You are gaining weight because you have changed your ability to regulate your diet.” And suffering metabolic syndrome means a raised risk of kidney, liver and heart disease as well as cancer.

Metabolic syndrome

Fructose causes obesity and metabolic syndrome by encouraging you to eat more and by clogging your cells’ energy generators, Johnson explains. “Our work also shows that sugar or fructose induces resistance to leptin,” which is the hormone the body uses to signal fullness to the brain. It also regulates how energetic we feel. Eating too much sugar, especially too quickly, eventually leads the brain to miss the “I’m full now” message.

Even when Johnson put lab animals, fed plenty of fructose, on a calorie-restricted diet, they still developed metabolic syndrome. Fructose primes the body: “When you eat fructose it makes [weight gain] real easy. The firewood is fat, but fructose is the fire,” is how Johnson explains this unhealthy fat-sugar duet.

Full article here

Richard Johnson, M.D., featured in the latest “Shape” magazine.

October 18, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News No Comments

Everything You Need to Know About Sugar

Shape magazine, 10.17

“Studies in animals show that fructose intake in particular can alter your ability to control appetite, reduce your ability to burn fat, and induce features of metabolic syndrome, such as raising blood pressure, increasing fat, and causing fatty liver and insulin resistance,” says Richard Johnson, M.D., professor of medicine at the University of Colorado in Denver and author of The Fat Switch.

 

Dr. Johnson featured in “The Economist”

September 20, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News No Comments

How the bacteria in your gut may be shaping your waistline

Metabolic syndrome can still be blamed on eating too much and exercising too little. But it is crucial to understand why some foods are particularly harmful and why some people gain more weight than others. Thankfully, researchers are beginning to offer explanations in a series of recent papers.

One debate concerns the villainy of glucose, which is found in starches, and fructose, found in fruits, table sugar and, not surprisingly, high-fructose corn syrup. Diets with a high “glycaemic index”, raising glucose levels in the blood, seem to promote metabolic problems. David Ludwig of Boston Children’s Hospital has shown that those on a diet with a low glycaemic index experience metabolic changes that help them keep weight off, compared with those fed a low-fat diet. This challenges the notion that a calorie is a calorie. Others, however, blame fructose, which seems to promote obesity and insulin resistance. Now a study published in Nature Communications by Richard Johnson, of the University of Colorado, explains that glucose may do its harm, in part, through its conversion to fructose.

Dr Johnson and his colleagues administered a diet of water and glucose to three types of mice. One group acted as a control and two others lacked enzymes that help the body process fructose. The normal mice developed a fatty liver and became resistant to insulin. The others were protected. The body’s conversion of glucose to fructose, therefore, seems to help spur metabolic woes. Full article here

Dr Johnson is on “Up All Night” on BBC Radio 5. Should sugar be regulated like dangerous drugs?

September 19, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News No Comments

Should sugar be regulated like dangerous drugs?

Should sugar be regulated like dangerous drugs?
BBC News
(Sept. 19, 2013) — Dr. Richard Johnson is a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado and has researched the effect of sugar on the human body. He told BBC Radio 5 live’s Up All Night: “The greatest problem is with drinks with sugar – because you get a large dose very rapidly… so labelling on soft drinks would be good.”

 

Dr. Johnson featured in the Irish Times

September 12, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News No Comments

It’s not that you get fat by eating too much or exercising too little, says Dr Richard Johnson, a leading kidney specialist at the University of Colorado. “You are gaining weight because you have changed your ability to regulate your diet.” And suffering metabolic syndrome means a raised risk of kidney, liver and heart disease as well as cancer.

Full story here:

Dr. Richard Johnson in National Geographic! (Sugar Love. A not so sweet story)

August 08, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News No Comments

The Culprit
“It seems like every time I study an illness and trace a path to the first cause, I find my way back to sugar.”

Richard Johnson, a nephrologist at the University of Colorado Denver, was talking to me in his office in Aurora, Colorado, the Rockies crowding the horizon. He’s a big man with eyes that sparkle when he talks. “Why is it that one-third of adults [worldwide] have high blood pressure, when in 1900 only 5 percent had high blood pressure?” he asked. “Why did 153 million people have diabetes in 1980, and now we’re up to 347 million? Why are more and more Americans obese? Sugar, we believe, is one of the culprits, if not the major culprit.”

Full story here:

 

“Sugar Love: A Not-So Sweet Story”

July 25, 2013  |  Post by:  |  Blog, News No Comments

Richard Cohen on http://thedianerehmshow.org/